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2020 Professional Development Institute

Excel Short Cut Keys—Making Your Job Tasks Easier for You!

Excel Short Cut Keys—Making Your Job Tasks Easier for You!
Presenter: Angela D. Passmore, Computer Education Department

An underutilized technique of increasing work efficiency is to use Excel shortcuts—or shortcut combination keys. Visualize simply pressing two or three keys on the keyboard as opposed to moving your hand to the mouse to accomplish a task in Excel. These shortcuts can perform many functions, from ones as simple as navigation within the spreadsheet to filling in formulas or grouping data, and are of particular help to users with carpel tunnel and vision or mobility disabilities. In this session, the presenter will explain how and why to use Excel Short Cut Keys, making your daily tasks faster and easier to complete.

Supporting Documents

How Satisfactory Academic Progress is Applied and Calculated

How Satisfactory Academic Progress is Applied and Calculated

Presenter: Suzanne Evans, Financial Aid Department

Learn more about Financial Aid at SJR State and how students’ Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAC) impacts enrollment!  This session discusses SAP Standards and General Policy Requirements, credit hour and clock hour examples, and what students can do if they fail SAP standards.

Supporting Documents

“I Want to Work in Healthcare but I Don't Like Blood!” Learn More About HIT Career Pathways

“I Want to Work in Healthcare but I Don't Like Blood!” Learn More About HIT Career Pathways

Presenters: Damarie Nix and Dr. Charlene Banta, Health Information Technology Department 

As an instructor, have you ever heard a student say, “I want to work in healthcare but I don't like blood?” and not known how to respond? Then this is the workshop for you! Let's talk about the blood-free Allied Health degree and certificate programs such as Health Information Technology, Health Services Management, and Medical Office Management. This presentation will focus on highlighting the opportunities for students who wish to work in health care but do not wish to work in a clinical capacity.

Supporting Documents 

 

Voices of Women: An Introduction to the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative

Voices of Women: An Introduction to the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative

Presenters: Lindsay Hall, Dual Enrollment Department, and Ann Spinler, Library Department

Introducing the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative at SJR State College! This initiative has been made possible through the partnership of SJR State’s Libraries and the Women’s Network. In this session, attendees will learn more about the 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative as well as events that will be held throughout the year. This is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy some “Equali-TEA” and connect with members of the SJR State family and beyond. 

Supporting Documents

Shared Vision- Vikings Against Violence

Shared Vision- Vikings Against Violence

Presenters: Jeff Gatlin, Kenlie Kubart, and Lindsay Thompson, Betty Griffin Center Room

Green Dot is a bystander intervention strategy that plays a key role to permanently reduce rates of violence and mobilize and empower all faculty, staff, and administrators at SJR State. Learn how we can engage and interrupt situations that are imminently or potentially high-risk for violence, increase self-efficacy and provide skill building. According to the CDC, this strategy has a greater than 50% reduction in frequency of sexual violence perpetration and has been implemented at Vanderbilt, the University of Virginia, and the University of Kentucky. Join this national movement today by coming to a brief overview and seeing what your role is in within your sphere of influence!

Supporting Documents 

Active Shooter/Violent Intruder and Workplace Awareness Training

Active Shooter/Violent Intruder and Workplace Awareness Training

Presenters: James Griffith and Mike Knowles 

Dictated by tragic events and statistics, SJR State Campus Safety and Security has revised its lockdown procedures to reflect the new standard of care developed and implemented by the Department of Homeland Security and other federal agencies designed to supplement/enhance protocols (response procedures) during an emergency. Between 2000-2013, there were 160 “active shooter” incidents, and about 70% of the incidents took place at schools or businesses. In order to mitigate causalities during an active shooter/violent intruder event, it is critical to train faculty, staff, and students on the concept of being proactive in order to build their confidence when reacting to time- sensitive, life-threatening situations. This training while use the concepts of ALICE – Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, and Evacuate – a set of options-based strategies that effectively prepare, prevent, and increase an individual’s chances of survival during a violent intruder or active shooter event.

Supporting Documents 

 

The Classroom Innovation: Preview the Florida Master Teacher Seminar

The Classroom Innovation: Preview the Florida Master Teacher Seminar

Presenter: Dr. Traci Reed, Mathematics Department 

This summer I had an opportunity to attend the Florida Master Teacher Seminar held at Pensacola State College. This session will share strategies and lessons learned from the Florida Master Teacher Seminar and information about participating in the annual event.

Supporting Documents 

 

“Students Learn Best in Their Preferred Learning Style” and Other Neuromyths

“Students Learn Best in Their Preferred Learning Style” and Other Neuromyths

Presenter: Dr. Anthony Carboni, Social Science/Psychology Department

“Right-Brained” Neuromyths are false beliefs often associated with teaching and learning that arise from misunderstandings about the brain and the mind. Based on survey responses from nearly a thousand instructors and support professionals, according to findings of the “International Report: Neuromyths and Evidence-Based Practices in Higher Education” released September 2019, professors are susceptible to neuromyths and so are the instructional designers and professional developers who support their teaching. Among the most widely believed neuromyths is that students learn best when they’re taught according to their “preferred learning style,” visual, aural, or hands-on learners for example. Other examples of pervasive neuromyths include that people can be “left-brained” or “right- brained” and that we use only ten percent of our brain. While belief in neuromyths has been established as prevalent among the general public and K-12 teachers, literature about neuromyth belief among higher education professionals (professors, instructors, and administrators) has not previously been well-researched.

Supporting Documents 


EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/EQUAL ACCESS COLLEGE | TITLE IX