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2020 Professional Development Institute

This Old Course

This Old Course: The Renovation of College Success
Presenters: Royce Bass, Library & Social Science adjunct; Mike Keller, Arts & Sciences; and Meghan Deputy, Dual Enrollment Department

Come learn about the how SJR State’s College Success Skills course is being renovated into “Academic Pathways for College Success.” We will walk you through the building process and timeline of the new General Education required course, its curriculum, and free OER instructional materials. We will also discuss the current Dual Enrollment cohort pilot program of the Pathways course.

Supporting Documents

Mindset Education and Interventions: Helping STEM Students Learn from Failure

Mindset Education and Interventions: Helping STEM Students Learn from Failure

Presenter: Cathy Wright, Science Department 

Why do we often see students with similar abilities have very different outcomes in our classrooms and labs? Students that have similar abilities may have very different mindsets. Mindset can be defined as the “implicit theory of intelligence.” There is evidence that what a person believes about their abilities, and the effort they exert in improving those abilities, is more important to their success than are the abilities themselves. This session will present information about Mindset, the difference between growth mindset and fixed mindset, goal orientation, fear of failure, attributions, and coping, and the impact of these constructs on academic challenges and students’ response to failure. This session will also provide participants with interventions, such as quiz debriefs and surveys, that can be used in the classroom or online to help students learn from failure. These tools were developed by FLAMEnet: the Failure as a part of Learning: A Mindset Education network.

Supporting Documents 

Building a Problem Based Learning (PBL) Culture in the Classroom

Building a Problem Based Learning (PBL) Culture in the Classroom

Presenter: Walter E. Lara, Computer Education and Visual Arts Departments 

Participants will be provided with PBL tools during the session and given the time to test them in a practical scenario. They will be a short introduction to the cycle of Critical Thinking, the algorithm for problem solving steps, the PBL types, a mention on practical critical thinking in a complex world, creativity, where ideas come from, and intellectual standards and integration.

Supporting Documents 

Tips & Strategies for Building Community in the College Classroom

Tips & Strategies for Building Community in the College Classroom

Presenter: Dr. Mary Ann Kester, Teacher Education Department

Building classroom community requires that faculty engage with students in intentional and meaningful ways with the goal of increasing positive interactions among students and between students and faculty.  Feeling a sense of community is associated with increased motivation, greater enjoyment of class, and more effective learning. Students engage more frequently in a classroom where they feel they are welcomed and valued.  In this session, participants will learn and practice tips and strategies that build classroom community in the college classroom.

Supporting Documents

The Palatka Campus Library Presents: A Student Success Book Tasting

The Palatka Campus Library Presents: A Student Success Book Tasting

Presenters: Dr. Brittnee Fisher, Joyce Smith, Ann Spinler, and Jennifer Anderson, Palatka Library

Visit the Palatka Campus Library to partake in a student success book tasting! Allow our five-star library staff to serve you a full course of student success resources! Discover new professional development resources about mindset,    study skills, time management, motivation, and stress management. Book tastings are a popular readers’ advisory tool which could easily be adapted to engage your students with library resources. Dine with us and we promise that you’ll leave full of great ideas!

Supporting Documents 

The Classroom Innovation: Preview the Florida Master Teacher Seminar

The Classroom Innovation: Preview the Florida Master Teacher Seminar

Presenter: Dr. Traci Reed, Mathematics Department 

This summer I had an opportunity to attend the Florida Master Teacher Seminar held at Pensacola State College. This session will share strategies and lessons learned from the Florida Master Teacher Seminar and information about participating in the annual event.

Supporting Documents 

 

“Students Learn Best in Their Preferred Learning Style” and Other Neuromyths

“Students Learn Best in Their Preferred Learning Style” and Other Neuromyths

Presenter: Dr. Anthony Carboni, Social Science/Psychology Department

“Right-Brained” Neuromyths are false beliefs often associated with teaching and learning that arise from misunderstandings about the brain and the mind. Based on survey responses from nearly a thousand instructors and support professionals, according to findings of the “International Report: Neuromyths and Evidence-Based Practices in Higher Education” released September 2019, professors are susceptible to neuromyths and so are the instructional designers and professional developers who support their teaching. Among the most widely believed neuromyths is that students learn best when they’re taught according to their “preferred learning style,” visual, aural, or hands-on learners for example. Other examples of pervasive neuromyths include that people can be “left-brained” or “right- brained” and that we use only ten percent of our brain. While belief in neuromyths has been established as prevalent among the general public and K-12 teachers, literature about neuromyth belief among higher education professionals (professors, instructors, and administrators) has not previously been well-researched.

Supporting Documents 

Promoting Student Engagement and Learning through Active Learning, Informal Assessment, and Timely Feedback

Promoting Student Engagement and Learning through Active Learning, Informal Assessment, and Timely Feedback

Presenter: Dustin Latta, Social Science Department 

The primary purpose of the session is to provide examples of how simple active learning strategies can be integrated to promote student engagement and a deeper understanding of course content. One strategy used to teach interdependent decision making will be demonstrated during the session. The session will also discuss the relevant literature that uses empirical evidence to support the use of active learning for introductory college courses. The session will conclude with ways to informally assess the effectiveness of the learning activity and strategies to provide timely feedback using technology.

Supporting Documents


EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/EQUAL ACCESS COLLEGE | TITLE IX